CALCULATING INCIDENT RATE of OSHA Recordable INJURIES

Calculating Your Incidence Rate is A Great Additional Optional Use for the 300A OSHA Form!

You can use the OSHA 300A form to calculate Injury and Illness Incidence Rates. Why is this helpful?  These rates can help you identify areas to improve your compliance with the OSHA health safety regulation, evaluate dangerous areas in your workplace, or better yet, highlight progress you have made in minimizing or eliminating occupational injuries and illnesses. 

What IS an Incidence Rate?

And incidence rate is the number of recordable injuries and illnesses occurring among:

  • A given number of full-time workers (usually as compared to 100 full-time workers)
  • Over a given period of time (usually a one-year span is used). 

Calculating the incident rate for your company allows you to evaluate your firm’s experience with your industry as a whole: 

  • Are you on track with the rest of your industry in terms of OSHA incident rates? 
  • Do you have gaps in the health safety regulations for your company?
  •  If so, each OSHA injury is likely already costing you money and productivity, as well as possibly endangering lives. 
  • OR is your recordable incident rate declining?  Calculating your recordable incidence rate is a GREAT way to find out if your company is on track!

 Let us strive to improve ourselves, for we cannot remain stationary: one either progresses or retrogrades.                           - Madame Marie Anne du Deffand

What Information is Needed for Calculating Incidence Rate?

There are three basic steps you must use to calculate incidence rate:

  • Tabulate all recordable OSHA injuries and illnesses during a given year.
    • Remember the OSHA Form 300 or the Summary Form 300A?  They are helpful once again!  (Who would ever believe that a government form could serve more than one purpose?!) In this case, either one will serve to give you the answer to this formula.
    • If using Form 300, simply count the number of line entries to know the number of recordable OSHA injuries and
    • If using Summary Form 300A, add the entries for columns (G), (H), (I), and (J). 
    • Now, using either form, you have the total number of recordable OSHA injuries.
  • Find out how many recordable OSHA injuries and illnesses involved days away from the company
    • Again, you can use either the Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (Form 300)
    • OR use the Summary Form 300A
    • With the OSHA 300, count the number of line entries on your OSHA Form 300 that received a check mark in column (H).
    • With the OSHA 300a, use the figure from column (H) as well.
  • Add up the number of hours all employees actually worked during the year.

The Following Incidence Rate Formulas are Available Here for FREE Downloadable, Re-Printable Use.

Calculating the Incidence Rate for All Recordable Cases of Injuries and Illnesses

     _________________ Total number of Injuries and Illnesses 

x        200,000    

=   _________________ 

÷   _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

=   _________________  Total Recordable Case Rate

The 200,000 figure refers to the number of hours 100 employees working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year would typically work.  Therefore, it establishes the standard base for calculating incidence rates. NOTE: When comparing illness rates by types of illness, use 20,000,000 hours instead of 200,000 hours to get a rate per 10,000 full-time employees. 

 

Calculating the Incidence Rate for Recordable Cases Involving Days Away From Work and/or Job Transfer (DART)

   _________________ Total Number of Cases with Days Away From Work - Form 300A - Column H

+  _________________ Number of Cases with Job Transfer or Restriction (Column I)

X         200,000

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked By All Employees

= _________________  DART Incidence Rate

 

Calculating the Incidence Rate for Days of Restricted Work Activity or Job Transfer (No Days Away From Work)

     _________________ Number of Cases with Job Transfer or Restriction - Form 300A - Column I

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Days of Restricted Work Activity or Job Transfer

 

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving Injuries

     _________________ Number of Cases Involving Injuries -Form 300A  Column M (1)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving Injuries

 

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving Skin Disorders

     _________________ Number of Cases Involving Skin Disorders -

                                   Form 300A - Column M (2)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving Skin Disorders

 

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving Respiratory Conditions

     _________________ Number of Cases Involving Respiratory Conditions - Form 300A

                                      - Column M (3)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving Respiratory Conditions

 

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving Poisonings

  _________________ Number of Cases Involving Poisonings -For 300A - Column M (4)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving Poisonings

  

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving Hearing Loss

   _________________ Number of Cases Involving Poisonings -Form 300A - Column M (5)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving Hearing Loss

 

Calculating Incidence Rates for Cases Involving All Other Illnesses

     _________________ Number of Cases Involving All Other Illnesses Fom 300A -Column M (6)

x             200,000    

= _________________

÷ _________________  Number of Hours Worked by all Employees

= _________________  Incidence Rate for Cases Involving All Other Illnesses

 

Using the OSHA Incidence Rates

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) compiles a survey of occupational injuries and illnesses each year and publishes incidence rate data in various categories:  Industry, Employer Size (no, they don’t care how much the CEO weighs!), etc. 

Incidence rates are helpful for an employer when the occupational injury and illness experience of the company is compared with that of other employers doing similar work with workforces of similar size. Information available from the BLS site permits detailed comparisons by industry and size of firm. (Scroll to the bottom of the BLS website for the links to industry-specific data.)

Additional information