Help for the Company Required by the Occupational Safety and Health Law to Track Injury and Illness

OSHA Workplace Safety Self-Inspection Checklist

Medical Services and First Aid for a Safe Workplace

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is there a hospital, clinic, or infirmary for medical care in proximity of your workplace?

                                                                                                  
If medical and first-aid facilities are not in proximity of your workplace, is at least one employee on each shift currently qualified to render first aid?
Concerning those employees that are expected to respond to medical emergencies:    
     Have they been offered the hepatitis B vaccination?

     Have they been trained on first-aid procedures to protect them from bloodborne pathogens, including general precautions?

   

     Do they have appropriate personal protective equipment and have they been trained on properly using it for protection against exposure to bloodborne diseases?

Have you provided immediate post-exposure medical evaluation and follow-up for employees who have been exposed to bloodborne pathogens?

Are emergency phone numbers posted?

Do you have first-aid kits easily accessible in each work area, with each kit stocked and re-checked periodically?
Are emergency phone numbers posted?
Have the first-aid kits been certified and/or approved by a physician, indicating that they are adequate for that work area?
Are facilities available for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body in work areas where corrosive liquids or materials are handled?

This OSHA Workplace Safety Self-Inspection Checklist is NOT all-inclusive.  You should add to them or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA standards for complete and specific guidelines on Medical Services and First Aid for a safe workplace that may apply to your work environment.  This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.   Additional economical training resources on How to Use First Aid and other OSHA workplace safety training can be found here.

Air Compressor Safety Checklist

Compressors - Air Receivers

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is every receiver equipped with a pressure gauge and with one or more automatic, spring-loaded safety valves?

             
Compressed Air Pressure: Is the total relieving capacity of the safety valve capable of preventing pressure of compressed air in the receiver from exceeding the maximum allowable working pressure of the receiver by more than 10 percent?      
Is every air receiver provided with a drain pipe and valve at the lowest point for the removal of accumulated oil and water?      
Are compressed air receivers periodically drained of moisture and oil?      
Before using an air compressor: Are all safety valves tested frequently and at regular intervals to determine whether they are in good operating condition?      
Is there a current operating permit used by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health?        
Is the inlet of air receivers and piping systems kept free of accumulated oil and carbonaceous materials?      

This pressure safety systems regulations checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each of these items of safety and policy procedure, and refer to OSHA for complete and specific occupational safety regulations that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.

For more information on OSHA-compliant safety training and regulations, please click here.

Self-Inspection

Ergonomics Safety Checklist

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist Needs to be Addressed Yes N/A

Is any employee dealing with eyestrain or glare in the process of doing their job?

     
Does any job task require prolonged raising of the arms?      
Do the neck and shoulders have to be stooped to view the task?      

Do workers experience any pressure points on any parts of their body (wrists, forearms, back of thighs)?
     
Can assigned tasks be done using the larger muscles of the body?      
Can the work be performed without twisting or overly bending the lower back?         

Are there sufficient rest breaks, in addition to the regular rest breaks, to relieve stress from repetitive motion tasks?

     

Are the tools, instruments, and machinery shaped, positioned, and handled in such a way that tasks can be performed confortably?

     

 

Are all pieces of furniture adjusted, positioned, and arranged to minimize strain on all parts of the body?

     

This Ergonomics Safety Checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item on ergonomic safety, and refer to OSHA standards for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This inspection sheet is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. 

Federal Health and Safety Regulations

Self-Inspection List:

Pneumatic Power Tools and Hose Checklist

(click on title for the printable PDF)

 

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A
Are pneumatic power tools secured to the hose or whip by some positive means, so as to prevent the tool from being accidentally disconnected?      
Are safety clips or retainers used on pneumatic impact (percussion) tools to prevent attachments from being accidentally expelled?      
Are all pneumatically driven nailers, staplers, and other similar equipment which have automatic fastener feeds and that operate at more than 100 psi pressure at the tool equipped with a safety device on the nozzle to prevent the tool from ejecting fasteners, unless the muzzle is in contact with the work surface?      
Are all compressed air hoses and hose connections designed for the pressure and service to which they are subjected?    
Is it prohibited to lower or hoist tools by the hose?      
Do all hoses (exceeding one-half inch inside diameter) have safety devices at the source of the supply or branch line, to reduce pressure in case of hose failure?      

Are airless spray guns (the type that atomizes paints and fluids at high pressure – 1,000 pounds or more per square inch) equipped with automatic or visible manual safety devices which prevent accidental release of paint or fluid?  OR

Is the airless spray gun equipped with a diffuser nut which will prevent high pressure, high velocity release while the nozzle tip is removed, plus a nozzle tip guard which will prevent the tip from coming in contact with the operator (or other equivalent protection)?

 

     

Are all fuel powered tools stopped when being refueled, serviced, or maintained?

     
Is all fuel transported, handled, and stored in accordance with applicable regulations?  
When fuel powered tools are used in enclosed spaces, are measures taken to prevent the build-up of toxic gases?

This OSHA/CDC pneumatic power tools and hose safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA federal health and safety regulations for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional hand and power tool safety workplace training can be found here.

Additional information