Help for the Company Required by the Occupational Safety and Health Law to Track Injury and Illness

Self-Inspection Checklist

Entering Confined Work Space

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are confined spaces thoroughly emptied of any confined space hazards:  corrosive or hazardous substances, such as acids or caustics, before entry?

               
Are all lines to a confined space, containing inert, toxic, flammable, or corrosive materials valved off and blanked or disconnected and separated before entering confined spaces?      
Are all impellersagitators, or other moving parts and equipment inside confined work spaces locked-out if they present a hazard?      
Is either natural or mechanical ventilation provided prior to confined work space entry?      
Are appropriate atmospheric tests performed to check for oxygen deficiency, toxic substances and explosive concentrations in the confined space before entry?      
Is adequate illumination provided for the work to be performed in the confined work space?        
Is the atmosphere inside the confined work space frequently tested or continuously monitored during conduct of work?      

Is there an assigned confined space attendant outside of the confined work space, when required, whose sole responsibility is to watch those working in a confined space, sound an alarm if necessary, and render assistance?

     
Are the confined space attendants or other employees prohibited from entering the confined work space without lifelines and respiratory equipment if there is any question as to the cause of an emergency?      
Is approved respiratory equipment required if the atmosphere inside the confined space cannot be made acceptable?      
Is all portable electrical equipment used inside confined spaces either grounded and insulated, or equipped with ground fault protection?      
Before gas welding or burning is started in a confined work space, are hoses checked for leaks, compressed gas bottles forbidden inside the confined space, torches lighted only outside of the confined area and the confined area tested for an explosive atmosphere EACH TIME before a lighted torch is to be taken into the confined space?      
If employees will be using oxygen-consuming equipment-such as salamanders, torches, and furnaces, in a confined space - is sufficient air provided to assure combustion without reducing the oxygen contrentration of the atmosphere below 19.5% by volume?      
Whenever combustion-type equipment is used in a confined space, are provisions made to ensure the exhaust gases are vented outside of the enclosure?      

This Confined Work Space checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item on this confined space checklist, and refer to OSHA inspections standards for complete and specific guidelines for safe work in confined spaces that may apply to your work environment. This confined work space list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training for confined space, respiratory training, or safety supplies can be found here.

Working Safety Self-Inspection

Environmental Controls

(click on title for the printable PDF)

 

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are all work areas properly illuminated?

             
Are employees instructed in proper first-aid and other emergency procedures?      
Are workplace hazards, such as hazardous substances, blood, and other potentially infectious materials identified, which may cause harm by inhalation, ingestion, or skin absorption or contact?      
Are employees aware of the work place hazards involved with the various chemicals they may be exposed to in their work environment, such as ammonia, chlorine, epoxies, caustics, etc.?      
Is employee exposure to chemicals in the workplace kept within acceptable levels?      
Can a less harmful method or process be used for working safety?        
Is the work area’s ventilation system appropriate for the work being performed?      

Are spray painting operations done in spray rooms or booths equipped with an appropriate exhaust system?

     
Is employee exposure to welding fumes controlled by ventilation, use of respirators, exposure time, or other means?
Are welders and other workers nearby provided with flash shields during welding operations?
If forklifts and other vehicles are used in buildings or other enclosed areas, are the carbon monoxide levels kept below maximum acceptable concentration?
Has there been a determination that OSHA noise levels in the facilities are within acceptable levels?
Are steps being taken to use engineering controls to reduce excessive workplace noise level?
Are proper environmental controls and precautions being taken when handling asbestos and other fibrous materials?
Are caution labels and signs used to warn of hazardous substances (e.g., asbestos), hazardous chemicals, and biohazards (e.g. bloodborne pathogens)?
Are wet methods used, when practicable, to prevent the emission of airborne asbestos fibers, silica dust and similar workplace hazards?
Are engineering controls examined and maintained or replaced on a scheduled basis?
Is vacuuming with appropriate equipment used whenever possible rather than blowing or sweeping dust?
Are grinders, saws, and other machines that produce respirable dusts vented to an industrial collector or central exhaust system?
Are all local exhaust ventilation systems designed and operating properly . . . . 
     Is the Air Flow system functioning properly?
     Is the volume of the exhaust ventilation system adequate?
     Are the ducts unplugged?
     Are the belts in place versus slipping?
Is PPE (personal protective equipment) for working safety provided, used and maintained wherever required?
Are there written standard operating procedures for the selection and use of respirators where needed?
Are restrooms and washrooms kept clean and sanitary?
Is all water provided for drinking, washing, and cooking potable?
Are all outlets for water not suitable for drinking clearly identified?
Are employees’ physical capacities assessed before being assigned to jobs requiring heavy work?
Are employees instructed in the proper manner of lifting heavy objects?
Where heat is a problem, have all fixed work areas been provided with spot cooling or air conditioning?
Are employees screened before assignment to areas of high heat to determine if their health condition might make them more susceptible to having an adverse reaction?
Are employees working on streets and roadways where they are exposed to the hazards of traffic, required to wear bright colored (traffic orange) warning vests?
Are exhaust stacks and air intakes so located that contaminated air will not be re-circulated within a building or other enclosed area?
Is equipment producing ultraviolet radiation properly shielded?
Are universal work safety precautions observed where occupational exposure to hazardous substances such as blood or other potentially infectious materials can occur and in all instances where differentiation of types of body fluids or potentially infectious materials is difficult or impossible?

This Environmental Controls checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each work safety item, and refer to OSHA environmental controls standards for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training resources for hazardous substances, hazardous chemicals, safety audit checklists, employee exposure, workplace noise level, and other safety supplies is available.

OSHA and Workplace Safety Self-Inspection Checklist

Flammable and Combustible Materials

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are combustible scrap, debris, and waste materials (oily rags, etc.) stored in covered metal receptacles and removed from the worksite promptly?

       
Is proper storage practiced to minimize the risk of fire including spontaneous combustion?      
Are approved containers and tanks used for the storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids?      
Are all connections on drums and combustible liquid piping, vapor and liquid tight?      
Are all flammable liquids kept in closed containers when not in use (e.g., parts cleaning tanks, pans, etc.)?      
Are bulk drums of flammable liquids grounded and bonded to containers during dispensing?        
Do storage rooms for flammable and combustible liquids have explosion-proof lights?      

Do storage rooms for flammable and combustible liquids have mechanical or gravity ventilation?

     

Is liquefied petroleum gas stored, handled, and used in accordance with safe practices and standards?

     
Are “NO SMOKING” signs posted on liquefied petroleum gas tanks?      

Are liquefied petroleum storage tanks guarded to prevent damage from vehicles?

     

Are all solvent wastes, and flammable liquids kept in fire-resistant, covered containers until they are removed from the worksite?

     

Is vacuuming used whenever possible rather than blowing or sweeping combustible dust?

     

Are firm separators placed between containers of combustibles or flammables, when stacked one upon another, to assure their support and stability?

     

Are fuel gas cylinders and oxygen cylinders separated by distance, and fire-resistant barriers, while in storage?

     

Are fire extinguishers selected and provided for the types of materials in areas where they are to be used?

     

     Class A - Ordinary combustible material fires

     

     Class B - Flammable, liquid, gas or grease fires

     
     Class C - Energized - electrical equipment fires      

Are appropriate fire extinguishers mounted within 75 feet of outside areas containing flammable liquids, and within 10 feet of any inside storage area for such materials?

     
Are all extinguishers serviced, maintained and tagged at intervals not to exceed 1 year?      

Are all extinguishers fully charged and in their designated places?

     
Where sprinkler systems are permanently installed, are the nozzle heads so directed or arranged that water will not be sprayed into operating electrical switch boards and equipment?      
Are "NO SMOKING" signs posted where appropriate in areas where flammable or combustible materials are used or stored?      
Are safety cans used for dispensing flammable or combustible liquids at a point of use?      

Are all spills of flammable or combustible liquids cleaned up promptly?

     
Are storage tanks equipped with emergency venting that will relieve excessive internal pressure caused by fire exposure?      

Are "NO SMOKING" rules enforced in areas involving storage and use of hazardous materials? 

     

This flammable and combustible materials checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each 2item, and refer to OSHA hazardous materials regulations for complete and specific guidelines on flammable and combustible materials that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.

Click here for affordable OSHA compliant supplies for employees using flammable and combustible materials.

Self-Inspection before OSHA Inspection:

Hazardous Chemical Exposure and Spill Response

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are employees trained in hazardous material handling: the safe handling practices of hazardous chemicals such as acids, caustics, etc.

               
Are employees aware of the potential exposure to hazardous chemicals stored or used in the workplace such as acids, bases, caustics, epoxies, and phenols?      
Is employee hazardous chemical exposure kept within acceptable levels?      
Are eye wash fountains and safety showers provided in areas where corrosive chemicals are handled?      
Are all containers, such as vats, and storage tanks labeled as to their contents, e.g., "CAUSTICS"?      
Are all employees required to use PPE (personal protective equipment) and clothing for hazardous material handling (gloves, eye protection, and respirators)?         
Are flammable or toxic chemicals kept in closed containers when not in use?      

Are chemical piping systems clearly marked as to their content?

     

Where corrosive liquids are frequently handled in open containers or drawn from storage vessels or pipe lines, are adequate means readily available for neutralizing or disposing of chemical spills or overflows and performed properly and safely?

     
Have standard operating procedures for spill response been established, and are they being followed when cleaning up a chemical spill?      

Where needed for emergency use, are respirators stored in a convenient, clean, and sanitary location?

     

Are respirators intended for emergency use adequate for the various uses for which they may be needed?

     

Are employees prohibited from eating in areas where there is exposure to hazardous chemicals?

     

Is PPE (personal protective equipment) provided, used and maintained whenever necessary?

     
Are there written standard operating procedures for the selection and use of respirators where needed?      
If you have a respirator protection program, are your employees trained on the correct usage and limitations of the respirators?      
Are the respirators NIOSH-approved for this particular application?      
Are the respirators regularly inspected and cleaned, sanitized and maintained?      
If hazardous substances are used in your processes, do you have a medical or biological monitoring system in operation?      
Are you familiar with the Threshold Limit Values or Permissible Exposure Limits of airborne contaminants and physical agents used in your workplace?      
Have control procedures been instituted for hazardous material handling, where appropriate, such as respirators, ventilation systems, and handling practices?      
Whenever possible, are hazardous substances handled in properly designed and exhausted booths or similar locations?      
Do you use general dilution or local exhaust ventilation systems to control dusts, vapors, gases, fumes, smoke, solvents or mists which may be generated in your workplace?      
Is ventilation equipment provided for removal of contaminants from such operations as production grinding, buffing, spray painting, and/or vapor degreasing, and is it operating properly?      
Do employees complain about dizziness, headaches, nausea, irritation, or other factors of discomfort when they use solvents or other chemical exposure in the workplace?      
Is there a dermatitis problem?  Do employees complain about dryness, irritation, or sensitization of the skin?      
Have you considered the use of an industrial hygienist or environmental health specialist to evaluate your chemical exposure in the workplace?      
If internal combustion engines are used, is carbon monoxide kept within acceptable levels?      
Is vacuuming used, rather than blowing or sweeping dusts whenever possible for clean-up?      
Are materials which give off toxic asphyxiant, suffocating, or anesthetic fumes, stored in remote or isolated locations when not in use?      

This Chemical Exposure and Hazardous Material Handling checklist is NOT all-inclusive.  You should add to it or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item on chemical exposure in the workplace, and refer to OSHA standards on chemical spill, spill response, hazardous material handling, hazardous material handling, and hazardous chemical exposure  for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment.  This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. 

Additional economical training resources on chemical spill, spill response, chemical exposure, hazardous material handling, hazardous materials spills, and exposure to hazardous chemicals can be found here.

Self-Inspection Checklist

Hazardous Substances Communication

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is a hazardous substances list used in your workplace?

               
Is there a current written exposure control plan for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and other potentially infectious materials, where applicable?      
Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), labeling, and employee training?      
Is each container for a hazardous substance (i.e., vats, bottles, storage tanks, etc.) labeled with product identity and a hazard warning (communication of the specific health hazards and physical hazards)?      
Are MSDS sheets (Material Safety Data Sheets) readily available for hazardous substances at work?      
Is there an employee training program for hazardous substances?        
Does this program included:    

       1.  An explanation of what are hazardous substances, what MSDS sheets are and how to use and obtain them? 

     

       2.  MSDS sheets for each hazardous substance or class of substances?

     
     3.  Explanation of “Right to Know?”      

     4.  Identification of where an employee can see the employer’s written hazards communication program  and where hazardous substances are present in their work areas?

     

     5.  The physical and health hazards of substances in the work area, and specific protectivemeasures to be used?

     

     6.  Details of the hazard communication program, including how to use the labeling system and MSDS’s?

     
   
Does the employee training program on the bloodborne  pathogens standard contain the following elements:
   

     1.  An accessible copy of the OSHA hazard communication standard 29 CFR 1910.1200 standardand  an  explanation  of its contents;

      
       2.  A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of bloodborne diseases;      
     3.  An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens;      

     4.  An explanation of the employer's exposure control plan and the means by which employees can obtain a copy of the written plan;

     

     5.  An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and the other activitities that may involve exposure to blood and other substances hazardous to health;

     
     6.  An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will prevent or reduce exposure including appropriate engineering controls, work practices, and PPE (personal protective equipement);      

     7.  Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination, and disposal of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment);

     
     8.  An explanation of the basis for selection of PPE;      
     9.  Information on the hepatitis B vaccine;      
    10. Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to contact in an emergency involving blood or other potentially infectious materials;      
    11. An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident occurs, including the methods of reporting the incident and the medical follow-up that will be made available.      
    12. Information on post-exposure evaluations and follow-up;      
    13.  An explanation of signs, labels, and color coding?      
       
Are employees trained in the following:      
     1.  How to recognize tasks that might result in occupational exposure?      
     2.  How to use work practice and engineering controls and personal protective equipment and to know their limitations?      
     3.  How to obtain information on the types, selection, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination, and disposal of personal protective equipment?      
     4.  Who to contact and what to do in an emergency?      

This Hazardous Substances and Materials checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item on OSHA Hazards,, and refer to OSHA standards for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. More affordable training and information on the Hazard Communication standards here.

Additional information