Help for the Company Required by the Occupational Safety and Health Law to Track Injury and Illness

Air Compressor Safety Checklist

Compressed Air Pressure, Compressors

and Compressed Air

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are compressors equipped with pressure relief valves, and pressure gauges?

               
Are compressor air intakes installed and equipped so as to ensure that only clean uncontaminated air enters the compressor?      
Are air filters installed on the compressor intake?      
Are compressors operated and lubricated in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations?      
Are safety devices on compressed air systems checked frequently?      
Before any repair work is done on the pressure system of a compressor, is the pressure bled off and the system locked-out?        
Are signs posted to warn of the automatic starting feature of the compressors?      

Is the belt drive system totally enclosed to provide protection for the front, back, top, and sides?

     

Is it strictly prohibited to direct compressed air toward a person?

     
Are employees prohibited from using highly compressed air for cleaning purposes?      

If compressed air is used for cleaning off clothing, is the pressure reduced to less than 10 psi?

     

When using compressed air for cleaning, do employees wear protective chip guarding and PPE (personal protective equipment)?

     

Are safety chains or other suitable locking devices used at couplings of high pressure hose lines where a connection failure would create a hazard?

     
Before compressed air is used with abrasive blast cleaning equipment, is the operating valve a type that must be held open manually?      
When compressed air is used to inflate auto ties, is a clip-on chuck and an inline regulator preset to 40 psi required?      
Is it prohibited to use compressed air to clean up or move combustible dust if such action could cause the dust to be suspended in the air and cause a fire or explosion hazard?      

This air compressor safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each of the air compressor safety tips, and refer to OSHA compressed air regulations for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment, including the standard on OSHA compressed air cleaning. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.

Additional economical training resources on compressed air pressure and OSHA compressed air regulations can be found here.

Federal Health and Safety Regulations

Self-Inspection List:

Compressed Gas Cylinders Checklist

(click on title for the printable PDF)

 

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A
Are pneumatic power tools secured to the hose or whip by some positive means, so as to prevent the tool from being accidentally disconnected?      
Are safety clips or retainers used on pneumatic impact (percussion) tools to prevent attachments from being accidentally expelled?      
Are all pneumatically driven nailers, staplers, and other similar equipment which have automatic fastener feeds and that operate at more than 100 psi pressure at the tool equipped with a safety device on the nozzle to prevent the tool from ejecting fasteners, unless the muzzle is in contact with the work surface?      
Are all compressed air hoses and hose connections designed for the pressure and service to which they are subjected?    
Is it prohibited to lower or hoist tools by the hose?      
Do all hoses (exceeding one-half inch inside diameter) have safety devices at the source of the supply or branch line, to reduce pressure in case of hose failure?      

Are airless spray guns (the type that atomizes paints and fluids at high pressure – 1,000 pounds or more per square inch) equipped with automatic or visible manual safety devices which prevent accidental release of paint or fluid?  OR

Is the airless spray gun equipped with a diffuser nut which will prevent high pressure, high velocity release while the nozzle tip is removed, plus a nozzle tip guard which will prevent the tip from coming in contact with the operator (or other equivalent protection)?

 

     

Are all fuel powered tools stopped when being refueled, serviced, or maintained?

     
Is all fuel transported, handled, and stored in accordance with applicable regulations?  
When fuel powered tools are used in enclosed spaces, are measures taken to prevent the build-up of toxic gases?

This OSHA/CDC pneumatic power tools and hose safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA federal health and safety regulations for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional hand and power tool safety workplace training can be found here.

OSHA Workplace Self-Inspection Checklist

Hoist Safety

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is each overhead electric hoist equipped with a limit device to stop the hook travel at its highest and lowest point of safe travel?

               
Will each hoist automatically stop and hold any load up to 125% of its rated load if its actuating force is removed?      
Is the rated load of each hoist legibly marked and visible to the operator?      
Are stops provided at the safe limits of travel for trolley hoist?      
Are the controls of hoist plainly marked to indicate the direction of travel or motion?      
Is each cage-controlled hoist equipped with an effective warning device?        
Are close-fitting guards or other suitable devices installed on hoist to assure hoist ropes will be maintained in the sheave groves?      

Are all hoist chains or ropes of sufficient length to handle the full range of movement of the application while still maintaining two full wraps on the drum at all times?

     
Are nip points or contact points between hoist ropes and sheaves which are permanently located within 7 feet of the floor, ground or working platform, guarded?      
 Is it prohibited to use chains or rope slings that are kinked or twisted?      
Is it prohibited to use the hoist rope or chain wrapped around the load as a substitute, for a sling?
     
Is the operator instructed to avoid carrying loads over people?
     

This Hoist Safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA workplace safety laws and regulations for complete and specific guidelines on hoist safety that may apply to your work environment.  This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.  For affordable safety training on hoist safety click here.

Self-Inspection

Industrial Truck - Forklift Checklist

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are only employees who have been trained in the proper use of hoists allowed to operate them?

               
Are only trained personnel personnel allowed to operate industrial trucks?
     
Is substantial overhead protective equipment provided on high lift rider equipment?      
Are the required lift truck operating rules posted and enforced?      
Is directional lighting provided on each industrial truck that operates in an area with less than 2 foot-candles per square foot of general lighting?      
Does each industrial truck have a warning horn, whistle, gong, or other device which can be clearly heard above the normal noise in the areas where operated?        
Are the brakes on each industrial truck capable of bringing the vehicles to a complete and safe stop when fully loaded?      

Will the industrial trucks' parking brake effectively prevent the vehicle from moving when unattended? 

     
Are industrial trucks operating in areas where flammable gases or vapors, or combustible dust or ignitable fibers may be present in the atmosphere, approved for such locations?      
Are motorized hand and hand/rider trucks so designed that the brakes are applied, and power to the drive motor shuts off when the operator releases his or her grip on the device that controls the travel?      
Are industrial trucks with internal combustion engines, operated in buildings or enclosed areas, carefully checked to ensure such operations do not cause harmful concentration of dangerous gases or fumes?      
Are powered industrial trucks being safely operated?      
Do the forklifts that are being used meet the design and construction requirements set by the American National Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks Part II ANSI B56.1-1969?      
Have any modifications or additions made to the forklifts that affect the capacity and safe operation of the vehicle?  If so, have you obtained written approval from the truck manufacturer?
Have the tags, decals, and instruction plates been changed to specify any modifications or additions to the capacity, operation, or maintenance of the forklift?
Are the nameplates and markings in place and legible?
Are any forklifts which are used in hazardous locations appropriately marked and approved for such use?
Is battery charging done in designated areas?
Have appropriate facilities been provided for flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolytes?
Has appropriate fire extinguishing equipment been provided?
Are the facilities for the charging apparatus protected from damage by trucks?
Is adequate ventilation provided to disperse fumes from gassing batteries?
Are conveyors, overhead hoists, or equivalent material handling equipment provided for handling batteries?
Are reinstalled batteries properly positioned and secured?
Are carboy tilters or siphons used for handling electrolytes?
Are forklifts properly positioned and brakes applied before workers start to change or charge batteries?
Are vent caps properly functioning?
Are precautions taken to prevent smoking, open flames, sparks, or electric arcs in the battery charging areas? 
Are precautions taken to prevent smoking, open flames, sparks, or electric arcs during storage and changing of propane fule tanks?
Are tools and other metallic objects kept away from the top of uncovered batteries?
Are concentrations of noxious gases and fumes kept below acceptable levels?
Have forklift operators demonstrated their competency to safely operate their forklifts through successful completion of forklift training?  
Is refresher training and an evaluation conducted whenever an operator has been observed operating the vehicle in an unsafe manner or has been involved in an accident or near-accident with the equipment?
Is refresher training and an evaluation conducted whenever an operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck or when a condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safe operation of the forklift?
Are evaluations of each operator's performance conducted at least once every three years?
Are the replacement parts in forklifts equivalent with the original safety design?
Are trucks examined for safety before being placed into service, and are unsafe or defective trucks removed from service?

This forklift checklist is NOT all-inclusive.  You should add to it or skip parts that are not applicable in a safety audit of your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA standards for complete and specific work safety procedures that may apply to your work environment.  This forklift checklist is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.

Self-Inspection of Work Safety Laws:

Spraying Operations

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is adequate ventilation assured before spray operations are started?

               
Is mechanical ventilation provided when operations are done in enclosed areas?      
When mechanical ventilation is provided during spraying operations, is it so arranged that it will not circulate the contaminated air?      
Is the spray area free of hot surfaces?      
Is the spray area at least 20 feet from flames, sparks, operating electrical motors and other ignition sources?      
Are portable lamps used to illuminate spray areas suitable for use in a hazardous location?        
Is approved respiratory equipment provided and used when appropriate during spraying operations?      

Do solvents used for cleaning have a flash point to 100°F or more?

     
Are fire control sprinkler heads kept clean?      
Are "NO SMOKING" signs posted in spray areas, paint rooms, paint booths, and paint storage areas?      
Is the spray area kept clean of combustible residue?      
Are spray booths constructed of metal, masonry, or other substantial noncombustible material?      
Are spray booths floors and baffles noncombustible and easily cleaned?      
Is infrared drying apparatus kept out of the spray area during spraying operations?      
Is the spray booth completely ventilated before using the drying apparatus?      
Is the electric drying apparatus properly grounded?      
Are lighting fixtures for spray booths located outside of the booth and the interior lighted through sealed clear panels?      
Are the electric motors for exhaust fans placed outside booths or ducts?      
Are belts and pulleys inside the booth fully enclosed?      
Do ducts have access doors to allow cleaning?      
Do all drying spaces have adequate ventilation?      

This Spray Booth Safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA work safety laws for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training resources regarding respiratory equipment can be found here.

Additional information