Help for the Company Required by the Occupational Safety and Health Law to Track Injury and Illness

Self-Inspection

Abrasive Wheel Equipment Grinders/

Abrasive Wheel Safety

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 (Updated version as of March 18, 2013)
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Do side guards cover the spindle, nut and flange and 75% of the wheel diameter?

Is the work rest used and kept adjusted to within 1/8 inch of the wheel?

             
Is the adjustable tongue on the top side of the grinder used and kept adjusted to within a 1/4 inch of the wheel?
Do side guards cover the spindle, nut, and flange and 75% of the wheel diameter?
 Are bench and pedestal grinders permanently mounted?
Are goggles or face shields always worn when grinding?
Is the maximum RPM rating of each abrasive wheel compatible with the RPM rating of the grinder motor?    
Are fixed or permanently mounted grinders connected to their electrical supply system with metallic conduit or other permanent wiring method?

Does each grinder have an individual on and off control switch?

Is each electrically operated grinder effectively grounded?

Before new abrasive wheels are mounted, are they visually inspected and ring tested?

Are dust collectors and powered exhausts provided on grinders used in operations that produce large amounts of dust?

Are splash guards mounted on grinders that use coolant to prevent the coolant reaching employees?

Is cleanliness maintained around grinders?

Does each electrically operated grinder have a permanent, continuous and effective path to ground?

This Abrasive Wheel Safety Checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA standards for complete and specific laws for employers that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training resources can be found here.

Self-Inspection Checklist

Powder Actuated Tools Safety

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Work Safety Guidelines Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Are employees who operate powder-actuated tools trained in their use and carry a valid operator's card?

                                                                                                    
Is each powder-actuated tool stored in its own locked container when not being used?      
Is a sign at least 7 inches by 10 inches with bold face type reading "POWDER-ACTUATED TOOL IN USE" prominently posted when the tool is being used?      
Are powder actuated tools left unloaded until they are actually ready to be used?      
Are powder actuated tools inspected for obstructions or defects each day before use?      
Do powder actuated tool operators have and use appropriate personal protective equipment such as hard hats, safety goggles, safety shoes and ear protectors?        

This Powder Actuated Tools Safety Checklist of work safety guidelines is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA powder actuated tools safety standards for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. 

Self-Inspection

Machine Safeguarding

(click on title for the printable PDF)

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is there a safeguarding machinery training program to instruct employees on safe methods of machine operation?

               
Is there sufficient supervision to guarantee that employees are following safety standards for machine safeguarding procedures?
     
Is there a regular program of safety standards inspection of machinery and equipment?      
Is all machinery and equipment kept clean and properly maintained?
     
Is sufficient clearance provided around and between machines to allow for safe operations, set up and servicing, material handling and waste removal?
     
Is equipment and machinery securely placed and anchored, when necessary to prevent tipping or other movement that could result in personal injury?        
Is there a power shut-off switch within reach of the operator's position at each machine?      

Can electric power to each machine be locked out for maintenance, repair, or security?

     

Are the noncurrent-carrying metal parts of electrically operated machines bonded and grounded?

     
Are foot-operated switches guarded or arranged to prevent accidental actuation by personnel or falling objects?      
Are manually operated valves and switches controlling the operation of equipment and machines clearly identified and readily accessible?      
Are all emergency stop buttons colored red?      
Are all pulleys and belts that are within 7 feet of the floor or working level properly guarded?      
Are all moving chains and gears properly guarded?      
Are splash guards mounted on machines that use coolant to prevent the coolant from reaching employees?      
Are protective safetyguard measures provided to guard the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards created at the point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks?      
Are machinery guards secure and arranged so that they do not pose a hazard in their use?      
If special hand tools are used for placing and removing material, do they protect the operator's hands?      
Are revolving drums, barrels, and containers that are required to be guarded by an enclosure that is interlocked with the drive mechanism, so that revolution cannot occur unless the guard enclosures is in place, so guarded?      
Do arbors and mandrels have firm and secure bearings and are they free from play?      
Are precautions in place to prevent machines from automatically starting when power is restored after a power failure or shutdown?      
Are machines free from excessive vibration when the largest size tool is mounted and run at full speed?      
If machinery is cleaned with compressed air, is air pressure controlled and personal protective equipment or other safeguards utilized to protect operators and other workers from eye and body injury?      
Are fan blades protected with a guard having openings no larger than 1/2 inch, when operating within 7 feet of the floor?      
Are saws used for ripping, equipped with anti-kick back devices and spreaders?      
Are radial arm saws so arranged that the cutting head will gently return to the back of the table when released?      

This Machine Safeguarding Checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item on safeguarding machinery, and refer to the OSHA safety standards for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment. This Machine Safeguarding list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training resources on machine safeguarding and other safety standards can be found here.

Self-Inspection

Lockout/Tagout Procedures

 (click on title for the printable PDF)

 Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist

Needs to be Addressed

Yes N/A

Is all machinery or equipment capable of movement, required to be de-energized or disengaged and locked-out during cleaning, servicing, adjusting or setting up operations, whenever required?

               
In places where the power disconnecting means for equipment does not also disconnect the electrical control circuit:    
       Are the appropriate electrical enclosures identified?      

       Are means provided to assure the control circuit can also be disconnected and locked-out?

     
Is the locking-out of control circuits in lieu of locking-out main power disconnects prohibited?      
Do all equipment control-valve handles have a means for locking-out?        
Does the lockout policy require that stored energy (mechanical, hydraulic, air, etc.) be released or blocked before equipment is locked-out for repairs?      

Are appropriate employees provided with individually keyed personal safety locks?

     

Does the equipment lockout procedure require employees to keep personal control of their key(s) while they have safety locks in use?

     
Who can remove a lockout tagout: Is it required that only the employee exposed to the hazard, place or remove the safety lock?      
Does the equipment lockout procedure require that employees check the safety of the lock-out by attempting a startup after making sure no one is exposed?      
Are employees instructed to always push the control circuit stop button immediately after checking the safety of the lock-out?      
Is there an equipment lockout practice provided to identify any or all employees who are working on locked-out equipment by their lockout lock or accompanying tags?      
Are a sufficient number of lockout tagout accidents preventative signs or tags and safety padlocks provided for any reasonably foreseeable repair emergency?      
When machine operations, configuration or size requires the operator to leave his or her control station to install tools or perform other operations, and that part of the machine could move if accidentally activated, is such element required to be separately locked or blocked out?      
In the event that equipment or lines cannot be shut down, locked-out and tagged, is a safe job procedure established and rigidly followed?      

This Control of Hazardous Energy Lockout Tagout Checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to it as necessary or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item as part of an equipment lockout procedure, and refer to OSHA standards on control of hazardous energy lockout tagout for complete and specific guidelines that may apply to your work environment and an appropriate lockout policy. This Control of Hazardous Energy Lockout Tagout list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime. Additional economical training resources on Lockout Policy and Safe Job Procedure can be found here.

Self-Inspection

Welding and Cutting and Brazing

(click on title for the printable PDF)

 

Date Inspected _____________ Date Completed _____________

 
Checklist Needs to be Addressed Yes N/A

Are only authorized and trained personnel permitted to use welding, cutting, or brazing equipment?

              
Does each operator have a copy of the appropriate operating instructions and are they directed to follow them?      
Are compressed gas cylinders regularly examined for obvious signs of defects, deep rusting, or leakage?      
Is care used in handling and storing cylinders, safety valves, and relief valves to prevent damage?      
Are precautions taken to prevent the mixture of air or oxygen with flammable gases, except at a burner or in a standard torch?      
Are only approved apparatus (torches, regulators, pressure reducing valves, acetylene generators, manifolds) used?        

 Are cylinders kept away from sources of heat? 

     

 Are the cyclinders kept away from elevators, stairs, or gangways

     

 Is it prohibited to use cylinders as rollers or supports?

     

Are empty cylinders appropriately marked and their valves closed?

     
Are signs reading: DANGER - NO SMOKING, MATCHES, OR OPEN LIGHTS, or the equivalent, posted?      
Are cylinders, cylinder valves, couplings, regulators, hoses, and apparatus kept free of oily or greasy substances?      
Is care taken not to drop or strike cylinders?      
Unless  secured on special trucks, are regulators removed and valve-protection caps put in place before moving cylinders?      
Do cylinders without fixed hand wheels have keys, handles, or non-adjustable wrenches on stem valves when in service?      
Are liquefied gases stored and shipped valve-end up with valve covers in place?      
Are provisions made to never crack a fuel gas cylinder valve near sources of ignition?      

This Welding and Cutting safety checklist is NOT all-inclusive. You should add to them or skip parts that are not applicable to your company.  Carefully consider each item, and refer to OSHA welding and cutting standards on cutting safety and hazards of welding for complete and specific guidelines that may help eliminate workplace hazards in your work environment. This list is typical for general industry, not construction or maritime.

Help your workers understand welder responsibility: Print this FREE Checklist to help your employees follow OSHA welding regulations.

http://osha-lockout.com/page6.html

Additional information